Allan, A., 3rd edition 1995,
THE EDUCATION AND PRACTICE OF THE GEODETIC SURVEYOR IN WESTERN EUROPE
(commonly referred to as the "Allan Report"), CLGE, UK, pp 1 - 159.

Comité de Liaison des Géomètres Européens / The European Council of Geodetic Surveyors


  MAIN CONTENTS:

 Titles and Credits
 Foreword
 Author's preface
 
  Chapters:Appendices A to D showing the National Scenarios in order:
 1   INTRODUCTION 1   BELGIUM7   ITALY13   AUSTRIA
 2   TOPOLOGY AND TAXONOMY  2   DENMARK8   LUXEMBOURG14   FINLAND
 3  GENERAL COMMENTS 3   FRANCE9   NETHERLANDS15   NORWAY
 4   CONCLUSIONS 4   GERMANY10   PORTUGAL16   SWEDEN
 5   GLOSSARY 5   GREECE11   SPAIN17   SWITZERLAND
   6   IRELAND12   UNITED KINGDOM 



Titles and Credits

THE EDUCATION AND PRACTICE OF THE GEODETIC SURVEYOR IN WESTERN EUROPE

A.L. ALLAN
University College London
1995


Published by
COMITÉ DE LIAISON DES GÉOMETRES-EXPERTS EUROPÉENS /
The EUROPEAN COUNCIL of GEODETIC SURVEYORS
Brussels 1995


Original printed and marketed by the ROYAL INSTITUTION of CHARTERED SURVEYORS United Kingdom


Foreword

We, the chairs of FIG Commission 1 - Professional Practice, and 2 - Professional Education, welcome the 1995 edition of the report of A L Allan published by the Comité de Liaison des Géometres-Experts Européens. This is the third edition now covering 17 countries in Western Europe with different educational and professional profiles of the surveying profession.

This report is helpful for the work of our commissions by showing the changes within the profession and in professional education throughout European countries which have taken place in recent years. The report facilitates the general insight and understanding of different systems of education and practice within the surveying profession.

Basic information about the structure and content of systems is the clue for co-operation, mutual confidence, and recognition which is becoming increasingly important within the European Union as well as the FIG commissions.

This third edition of the Allan Report will be beneficial for constituting and improving the surveying profession at national and international levels.

Ken Allred
Chairman - Commission 1

Stig Enemark
Chairman - Commission 2



Author's preface

The Comité de Liaison des Géometres-Experts Européens was formed in l972 by the nine member-countries of the EEC to consider the implementation of the Treaty of Rome in relation to the profession of surveying. It has directed its attention to those provisions of the Treaty which relate to rights of establishment and rights to practise, including the possible harmonisation of qualifications and the removal of impediments to the freedom to offer professional services anywhere within the Community.

The application of the Treaty of Rome to the surveying profession is a complex matter. The profession has developed along different lines in each country and the scope of its activities now varies in consequence. Educational patterns also vary, partly because the areas of study differ according to the scope of the profession and partly because in some countries professional qualifications are conferred by the State, while in others this function is entrusted to the profession.

National circumstances also vary in another important respect. In some countries, certain functions of the profession are quasi-judicial in nature; in a few cases, other functions can only be performed by persons who hold a statutory qualification; but there are also many functions which can already be freely exercised across national boundaries.

Against this complex background, the Comité de Liaison des Géometres-Experts Européens decided that it should commission a detailed study of the functions performed by the profession in each of the European countries of Western Europe and the arrangements for professional education and training therein.

It has been my privilege to compile reports published in l980 and 1989. In consequence of recent developments to reach agreement within Europe concerning the mutual recognition of diplomas, a third, updated and enlarged report was deemed essential. The current text is the outcome.

In carrying out my task I visited all seventeen countries expressly to study educational establishments and practices. I was able to inspect student course work, meet students and teachers, visit professional establishments, and have detailed discussions in the various professional institutions concerned. My indebtedness to all persons involved is acknowledged with thanks, humility and pleasure.

This task could not have been accomplished without the financial support of all CLGE member associations, and especially the RICS Education Trust who funded all my travel expenses over the years. I wish to express my thanks to them for this support.

Arthur L Allan
University College London 1995
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Published by the Comité de Liaison des Géometres Européens / The European Council of Geodetic Surveyors, Brussels 1995